georgetakei:

From a fan:  Math. It’s so tricky sometimes. http://ift.tt/1rILfkv

georgetakei:

From a fan: Math. It’s so tricky sometimes. http://ift.tt/1rILfkv

staff:

Congrats to the Fred Levy and his Black Dogs Project blog. It’s an effort to correct the fact that black dogs are sadly, routinely passed over for adoption. It’s nothing but photos of black dogs against black backgrounds, it’s beautiful, and it’s about to become a book. It’ll be out in fall of 2015, and its pages will be heavy with ink.

If you yourself have a black dog, by the way, Fred still needs models… 

textless:

This is only the second time I have ever seen a pink grasshopper, and the first time I’ve ever gotten a photo of one. 

The pink color is caused by a recessive gene similar to the one that causes albinism.  It was hopping around on a hill at Curecanti National Recreation Area, June 2014.

(via allcreatures)

fieldsofcoldflowers:

And here we go! It’s a board game made for my Scientific Illustration class a few years ago. The game pieces are tapeworm heads made out of sculpey, the dice are chunks of meat with cystic larvae in them, and the object of the game is to collect enough carbohydrates to buy segments and end up in your game piece’s intended host and reproduce. I can’t tell you how much fun I had making it:D

fieldsofcoldflowers:

And here we go! It’s a board game made for my Scientific Illustration class a few years ago. The game pieces are tapeworm heads made out of sculpey, the dice are chunks of meat with cystic larvae in them, and the object of the game is to collect enough carbohydrates to buy segments and end up in your game piece’s intended host and reproduce. I can’t tell you how much fun I had making it:D

(via scientificillustration)

onceuponatown:

New York: Neon signs advertising jazz clubs at 52nd street, 1948.
Following the repeal of Prohibition in 1933, 52nd Street replaced 133rd street as “Swing Street” of the city. The blocks of 52nd Street between Fifth Avenue and Seventh Avenue became renowned for the abundance of jazz clubs and lively street life. The street was convenient to musicians playing on Broadway and the ‘legitimate’ nightclubs and was also the site of a CBS studio. Musicians who played for others in the early evening played for themselves on 52nd Street.
In its heyday from 1930 through the early 1950s, 52nd Street clubs hosted such jazz legends as Miles Davis, Harry Gibson, Dizzy Gillespie, Billie Holiday, Nat Jaffe, Marian McPartland, Thelonious Monk, Charlie Parker, Louis Prima, Art Tatum, Fats Waller, Trummy Young, and many more. Although musicians from all schools performed there, after Minton’s Playhouse in uptown Harlem, 52nd Street was the second most important place for the dissemination of bebop; In fact, a tune called “52nd Street Theme” by Thelonious Monk became a bebop anthem and jazz standard.
Photo by William P.Gottlieb.

onceuponatown:

New York: Neon signs advertising jazz clubs at 52nd street, 1948.

Following the repeal of Prohibition in 1933, 52nd Street replaced 133rd street as “Swing Street” of the city. The blocks of 52nd Street between Fifth Avenue and Seventh Avenue became renowned for the abundance of jazz clubs and lively street life. The street was convenient to musicians playing on Broadway and the ‘legitimate’ nightclubs and was also the site of a CBS studio. Musicians who played for others in the early evening played for themselves on 52nd Street.

In its heyday from 1930 through the early 1950s, 52nd Street clubs hosted such jazz legends as Miles Davis, Harry Gibson, Dizzy Gillespie, Billie Holiday, Nat Jaffe, Marian McPartland, Thelonious Monk, Charlie Parker, Louis Prima, Art Tatum, Fats Waller, Trummy Young, and many more. Although musicians from all schools performed there, after Minton’s Playhouse in uptown Harlem, 52nd Street was the second most important place for the dissemination of bebop; In fact, a tune called “52nd Street Theme” by Thelonious Monk became a bebop anthem and jazz standard.

Photo by William P.Gottlieb.

(via oldnewyork)

blujayart:

This is one of the craziest things I’d ever heard of, and I spent the entire rest of the day after learning this being super excited (and slightly terrified) about it.

If you can’t read my handwriting, this is Epomis dejeani. There are all kinds of crazy videos of these things taking down frogs and toads (you might not wanna watch if you’re squeamish, they get a bit gruesome). In that last link, the frog eats the larva, which continues moving around inside it until the frog spits it up two hours later, at which point the larva turns around and eats thefrog HOLY CRAP

Also did I mention the adults actually paralyze their victims? Scientists aren’t even sure how they do it— they bite the back, but the spinal cord is actually intact

So yeah, that’s freakin nuts. Here’s an article with more information on this ridiculous species. I STILL can’t get over this.

(via scientificillustration)

staceythinx:

ELINtm “specialises in textile and crochet nature studies to wear and admire”.

(Source: pinterest.com)

eisenstolz:

Method of Death - Extreme EccentricityThe Collyer brothers, extreme cases of eccentric compulsive hoarders, were found dead in their home in New York in 1947. The younger brother, Langley, died by falling victim to a booby trap he had set up, causing a mountain of objects, books, and newspapers to fall on him crushing him to death. His blind brother, Homer, who had depended on Langley for care, died of starvation some days later. Their bodies were recovered after massive efforts in removing many tons of debris from their home.

eisenstolz:

Method of Death - Extreme Eccentricity

The Collyer brothers, extreme cases of eccentric compulsive hoarders, were found dead in their home in New York in 1947. The younger brother, Langley, died by falling victim to a booby trap he had set up, causing a mountain of objects, books, and newspapers to fall on him crushing him to death. His blind brother, Homer, who had depended on Langley for care, died of starvation some days later. Their bodies were recovered after massive efforts in removing many tons of debris from their home.

(via oldnewyork)

allcreatures:


A brown bear is checked by foreign vets and local staff members at the Four Paws Bear Sanctuary in Pristina, Kosovo. Six adult brown bears have been rescued from illegal private zoos all over Kosovo, and three recently found brown bear orphan cubs received thorough health check-ups and dental treatment.

Picture: REUTERS/Hazir Reka (via Animal photos of the week - Telegraph)

allcreatures:

A brown bear is checked by foreign vets and local staff members at the Four Paws Bear Sanctuary in Pristina, Kosovo. Six adult brown bears have been rescued from illegal private zoos all over Kosovo, and three recently found brown bear orphan cubs received thorough health check-ups and dental treatment.

Picture: REUTERS/Hazir Reka (via Animal photos of the week - Telegraph)

Yet another round of Draw a Cool Chick from History

coolchicksfromhistory:

The theme will be Great Grannies of STEM, women who contributed to science, math, technology, medicine, etc. and were born prior to 1800. Deadline for art: June 15.

How it works: If you’re interested, message Cool Chicks from History for a name and details on how to submit. Complete a drawing by…

"The best children’s books aren’t the ones that impart moral lessons. The best children’s books are the ones that plant indelible memories and teach by way of detail: Madeline’s removed appendix; the ‘grisly’ pigeon that Eloise yells at until he flies over to the Sherry-Netherland. Who knows what a young reader will glom onto and why; a growing mind is populated arbitrarily."

Alice Gregory remembers her favorite book as a child: http://nyr.kr/1rrDISG (via newyorker)

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

atlasobscura:

The Mummies of Mexico City

Being in Mexico City for Holy Week has its advantages. If you’re interested in Catholic rites and rituals you’ll find plenty to do during the solemn holy days leading up to Easter. Some parishes sponsor reenactments of the crucifixion performed with varying degrees of historical accuracy and gore. Others hold funeral processions featuring life-sized effigies of Jesus in glass caskets. In a handful of places you can still find people who burn Judas in the form of papier-mâché devils.

But if you’re interested in traditional tourism or just looking for something to do in between services, you’ll find you’re mostly out of luck. The historic churches are in full mourning. Their best artwork and altarpieces are obscured by purple drapes to emphasize the sadness of these holidays. Many of the city’s excellent museums are closed. The locals are going to church, getting out of town or just enjoying some time off. I was the odd tourist out — wandering around the city on a day when everyone else had somewhere to be.

That’s how I wound up alone with twelve mummies. 

Keep reading Elizabeth Harper’s account of meeting the mummies of Museo de El Carmen, on Atlas Obscura… 

atlasobscura:

The Mummies of Mexico City

Being in Mexico City for Holy Week has its advantages. If you’re interested in Catholic rites and rituals you’ll find plenty to do during the solemn holy days leading up to Easter. Some parishes sponsor reenactments of the crucifixion performed with varying degrees of historical accuracy and gore. Others hold funeral processions featuring life-sized effigies of Jesus in glass caskets. In a handful of places you can still find people who burn Judas in the form of papier-mâché devils.

But if you’re interested in traditional tourism or just looking for something to do in between services, you’ll find you’re mostly out of luck. The historic churches are in full mourning. Their best artwork and altarpieces are obscured by purple drapes to emphasize the sadness of these holidays. Many of the city’s excellent museums are closed. The locals are going to church, getting out of town or just enjoying some time off. I was the odd tourist out — wandering around the city on a day when everyone else had somewhere to be.

That’s how I wound up alone with twelve mummies. 

Keep reading Elizabeth Harper’s account of meeting the mummies of Museo de El Carmen, on Atlas Obscura… 

biomedicalephemera:

scientificillustration:

bonedahlia:

hrokr:

Three dog skulls from ‘Secrets of Bones’ hosted by Ben Garrod. The first image shows a regular dog skull; this contains both collagen, an organic compound, and calcium phosphate, a mineral compound.

In the images with the red gloves, another skull has been left in an oven for a few days. This has taken out all of the organic compounds, leaving just the mineral compounds. As you can see, this bone is too brittle to be of structural use.

In the images with the blue gloves, a skull has been soaked in formic acid for over a month. This removed the calcium phosphate from the bone but leaves the collagen. The surprising result is a very flexible skull.

Whaaaat. That is awesome.

If you haven’t seen ‘Secrets of Bones’ I’d highly recommend it. Here are links to the episodes on YouTube:

S01 E01 Size Matters

S01 E02 Down To Earth

S01 E03 Into The Air

S01 E04 Sensing The World

S01E05 Food For Thought

GO. Watch. Because I said so, that’s why!