Lauren Bacall in How to Marry a Millionaire (1953)

(Source: vintagegal, via vintagegal)

staceythinx:

These Japanese iPhone cases in the shape of isopods are a cool idea in theory, but I don’t think I could bring myself to put it anywhere near my face.

(Source: Laughing Squid)

GET TO KNOW ME MEME: Favorite Movies [1/10] The NeverEnding Story (1984)
↳ “Don’t you know anything about Fantasia? It’s the world of human fantasy. Every part, every creature of it, is a piece of the dreams and hopes of mankind. Therefore, it has no boundaries.”

(Source: savingchesters, via vintagegal)

atlasobscura:

WISHING TREES: WHERE MONEY GROWS IN THE BRANCHES
BY ALLISON MEIER / 30 JUL 2014
In some places people toss coins into fountains begging for a wish, but in parts of the United Kingdom coins are pressed into trees for the same purpose. These “wishing trees” or “money trees” are a strange fusion of nature and manufactured metal, and represent a tradition dating back centuries.
Learn more and see some amazing photos at Atlas OBscura

atlasobscura:

WISHING TREES: WHERE MONEY GROWS IN THE BRANCHES

BY ALLISON MEIER / 30 JUL 2014
In some places people toss coins into fountains begging for a wish, but in parts of the United Kingdom coins are pressed into trees for the same purpose. These “wishing trees” or “money trees” are a strange fusion of nature and manufactured metal, and represent a tradition dating back centuries.

"The brain presents two seemingly irreconcilable aspects: It is a material body, exhibiting all the physical properties of matter, and it possesses a set of faculties and attributes, collectively called mind, that are not found in any other physical system."

Erich Harth- Windows of the Mind, 1982 (via houseofmind)

ucsdhealthsciences:

Birthday Matters for Wiring-Up the Brain’s Vision Centers
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have evidence suggesting that neurons in the developing brains of mice are guided by a simple but elegant birth order rule that allows them to find and form their proper connections.
The study is published online July 31 in Cell Reports.
“Nothing about brain wiring is haphazard,” said senior author Andrew Huberman, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Neurosciences, Division of Biological Sciences and Department of Ophthalmology, UC San Diego.
A mature, healthy brain has billions of precisely interconnected neurons. Yet the brain starts with just one neuron that divides and divides – up to 250,000 new neurons per minute at times during early development. The question for biologists has been how do these neurons decide which other neurons to connect to, a process neuroscientists call target selection.
The answer has both fundamental scientific value and clinical relevance. Some researchers believe that autism and other disorders linked to brain development may be caused, in part, by a failure of neurons to properly reposition their axons as needed when mistakes in target selection occur.
To better understand how a young brain gets wired, researchers focused on the development of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in mice. These cells connect the eyes and brain. Specifically, the main cell bodies of RGCs reside in the retina but their axons – slender projections along which electrical impulses travel – extend into the centers of the brain that process visual information and give rise to what we commonly think of as “sight,” as well as other light-influenced physiological processes, such as the effect of light on mood.
For the study, scientists tagged RGCs and watched where they directed their axons during development. The experiments revealed that specific types of RGCs target specific areas of the brain, allowing mice to do things such as sense direction of motion, move their eyes and detect changes in daily light cycles. It was also observed that some types of RGCs (such as those that detect brightness and control pupil constriction) are created early in development while others (such as those controlling eye movements) are created later.
The study’s main finding is that early RGCs (those created early in the sequence of brain division) make a lot of connections to other neurons and a lot of mistakes, which they then correct by repositioning or removing their axons. By contrast, later RGCs were observed to be highly accurate in their target selection skills and made almost no errors.
“The neurons are paying attention to when they were born and reading out which choices they should make based on their birthdate,” said Jessica Osterhout, a doctoral student in biology and the study’s lead author. “It seems to all boil down to birthdate.”
The idea that timing is important for cell differentiation is a classic principle of developmental biology, but this study is among the first to show that the timing of neuronal generation is linked to how neurons achieve specific brain wiring.
In addition to clarifying normal brain development, researchers plan to examine the role of time-dependent wiring mishaps in models of human disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia, as well as diseases specific to the visual system, such as congenital blindness.
“We want to know if in diseases such as autism neurons are made out of order and as a result get confused about which connections to make,” Huberman said.

ucsdhealthsciences:

Birthday Matters for Wiring-Up the Brain’s Vision Centers

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have evidence suggesting that neurons in the developing brains of mice are guided by a simple but elegant birth order rule that allows them to find and form their proper connections.

The study is published online July 31 in Cell Reports.

“Nothing about brain wiring is haphazard,” said senior author Andrew Huberman, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Neurosciences, Division of Biological Sciences and Department of Ophthalmology, UC San Diego.

A mature, healthy brain has billions of precisely interconnected neurons. Yet the brain starts with just one neuron that divides and divides – up to 250,000 new neurons per minute at times during early development. The question for biologists has been how do these neurons decide which other neurons to connect to, a process neuroscientists call target selection.

The answer has both fundamental scientific value and clinical relevance. Some researchers believe that autism and other disorders linked to brain development may be caused, in part, by a failure of neurons to properly reposition their axons as needed when mistakes in target selection occur.

To better understand how a young brain gets wired, researchers focused on the development of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in mice. These cells connect the eyes and brain. Specifically, the main cell bodies of RGCs reside in the retina but their axons – slender projections along which electrical impulses travel – extend into the centers of the brain that process visual information and give rise to what we commonly think of as “sight,” as well as other light-influenced physiological processes, such as the effect of light on mood.

For the study, scientists tagged RGCs and watched where they directed their axons during development. The experiments revealed that specific types of RGCs target specific areas of the brain, allowing mice to do things such as sense direction of motion, move their eyes and detect changes in daily light cycles. It was also observed that some types of RGCs (such as those that detect brightness and control pupil constriction) are created early in development while others (such as those controlling eye movements) are created later.

The study’s main finding is that early RGCs (those created early in the sequence of brain division) make a lot of connections to other neurons and a lot of mistakes, which they then correct by repositioning or removing their axons. By contrast, later RGCs were observed to be highly accurate in their target selection skills and made almost no errors.

“The neurons are paying attention to when they were born and reading out which choices they should make based on their birthdate,” said Jessica Osterhout, a doctoral student in biology and the study’s lead author. “It seems to all boil down to birthdate.”

The idea that timing is important for cell differentiation is a classic principle of developmental biology, but this study is among the first to show that the timing of neuronal generation is linked to how neurons achieve specific brain wiring.

In addition to clarifying normal brain development, researchers plan to examine the role of time-dependent wiring mishaps in models of human disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia, as well as diseases specific to the visual system, such as congenital blindness.

“We want to know if in diseases such as autism neurons are made out of order and as a result get confused about which connections to make,” Huberman said.

(via biologylair)

georgetakei:

From a fan:  Math. It’s so tricky sometimes. http://ift.tt/1rILfkv

georgetakei:

From a fan: Math. It’s so tricky sometimes. http://ift.tt/1rILfkv

staff:

Congrats to the Fred Levy and his Black Dogs Project blog. It’s an effort to correct the fact that black dogs are sadly, routinely passed over for adoption. It’s nothing but photos of black dogs against black backgrounds, it’s beautiful, and it’s about to become a book. It’ll be out in fall of 2015, and its pages will be heavy with ink.

If you yourself have a black dog, by the way, Fred still needs models… 

textless:

This is only the second time I have ever seen a pink grasshopper, and the first time I’ve ever gotten a photo of one. 

The pink color is caused by a recessive gene similar to the one that causes albinism.  It was hopping around on a hill at Curecanti National Recreation Area, June 2014.

(via allcreatures)

fieldsofcoldflowers:

And here we go! It’s a board game made for my Scientific Illustration class a few years ago. The game pieces are tapeworm heads made out of sculpey, the dice are chunks of meat with cystic larvae in them, and the object of the game is to collect enough carbohydrates to buy segments and end up in your game piece’s intended host and reproduce. I can’t tell you how much fun I had making it:D

fieldsofcoldflowers:

And here we go! It’s a board game made for my Scientific Illustration class a few years ago. The game pieces are tapeworm heads made out of sculpey, the dice are chunks of meat with cystic larvae in them, and the object of the game is to collect enough carbohydrates to buy segments and end up in your game piece’s intended host and reproduce. I can’t tell you how much fun I had making it:D

(via scientificillustration)

onceuponatown:

New York: Neon signs advertising jazz clubs at 52nd street, 1948.
Following the repeal of Prohibition in 1933, 52nd Street replaced 133rd street as “Swing Street” of the city. The blocks of 52nd Street between Fifth Avenue and Seventh Avenue became renowned for the abundance of jazz clubs and lively street life. The street was convenient to musicians playing on Broadway and the ‘legitimate’ nightclubs and was also the site of a CBS studio. Musicians who played for others in the early evening played for themselves on 52nd Street.
In its heyday from 1930 through the early 1950s, 52nd Street clubs hosted such jazz legends as Miles Davis, Harry Gibson, Dizzy Gillespie, Billie Holiday, Nat Jaffe, Marian McPartland, Thelonious Monk, Charlie Parker, Louis Prima, Art Tatum, Fats Waller, Trummy Young, and many more. Although musicians from all schools performed there, after Minton’s Playhouse in uptown Harlem, 52nd Street was the second most important place for the dissemination of bebop; In fact, a tune called “52nd Street Theme” by Thelonious Monk became a bebop anthem and jazz standard.
Photo by William P.Gottlieb.

onceuponatown:

New York: Neon signs advertising jazz clubs at 52nd street, 1948.

Following the repeal of Prohibition in 1933, 52nd Street replaced 133rd street as “Swing Street” of the city. The blocks of 52nd Street between Fifth Avenue and Seventh Avenue became renowned for the abundance of jazz clubs and lively street life. The street was convenient to musicians playing on Broadway and the ‘legitimate’ nightclubs and was also the site of a CBS studio. Musicians who played for others in the early evening played for themselves on 52nd Street.

In its heyday from 1930 through the early 1950s, 52nd Street clubs hosted such jazz legends as Miles Davis, Harry Gibson, Dizzy Gillespie, Billie Holiday, Nat Jaffe, Marian McPartland, Thelonious Monk, Charlie Parker, Louis Prima, Art Tatum, Fats Waller, Trummy Young, and many more. Although musicians from all schools performed there, after Minton’s Playhouse in uptown Harlem, 52nd Street was the second most important place for the dissemination of bebop; In fact, a tune called “52nd Street Theme” by Thelonious Monk became a bebop anthem and jazz standard.

Photo by William P.Gottlieb.

(via oldnewyork)

blujayart:

This is one of the craziest things I’d ever heard of, and I spent the entire rest of the day after learning this being super excited (and slightly terrified) about it.

If you can’t read my handwriting, this is Epomis dejeani. There are all kinds of crazy videos of these things taking down frogs and toads (you might not wanna watch if you’re squeamish, they get a bit gruesome). In that last link, the frog eats the larva, which continues moving around inside it until the frog spits it up two hours later, at which point the larva turns around and eats thefrog HOLY CRAP

Also did I mention the adults actually paralyze their victims? Scientists aren’t even sure how they do it— they bite the back, but the spinal cord is actually intact

So yeah, that’s freakin nuts. Here’s an article with more information on this ridiculous species. I STILL can’t get over this.

(via scientificillustration)

staceythinx:

ELINtm “specialises in textile and crochet nature studies to wear and admire”.

(Source: pinterest.com)